Parasite - Review

October 29, 2019




You know what kind of plan never fails? No plan. No plan at all. It is hard to contain Joon-ho Bong’s
Parasite in one genre, the closest thing I can segment this movie in is the masterpiece category. Parasite is a story about a prideful but desperate family trying to crawl their way up from their poverty through minimum wage jobs for another oblivious rich family. While Joker brings up the topic of class differences and the injustice of it all, Parasite manages to tread the thin line between poverty porn and social commentary in a much elaborate and overall better way. It had me laughing at situations that I would normally tear up at in real life, and had my heart speeding up uncontrollably while the action sequences fell like dominoes. Parasite made me ask myself questions that I would normally never think about, are rich people nice? or are they nice because they’re rich? It is quite heartbreaking seeing the lengths people are willing to go just so they can simply live, and the film's commentary on how class solitary can trump patriotism resonates globally. I loved Hong Kyung-Pyo's work on Snowpiercer and his work on Parasite is equally phenomenal if it not more so. The space given in the film with the marvel of a house they shot in was used impeccably, and Jeong Jae-il’s score easily surpass his work on Okja. Kang-ho Song who normally outshine everyone he’s sharing the screen with does not disappoint with Parasite, however, So-dam Park who plays his daughter comes close. Yeo-Jeong Jo plays the simpleton rich housewife perfectly, it was kind of chilling how close her character measures up to real-life people I’ve met. Parasite is a funny heartbreaking experience that will make you ask questions and reflect on your reality. Its social commentary is nothing new, but the way the film goes about it is vastly superior. When it comes to this movie believe the hype, because it is worth it.

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